London’s Kensington Garden Flower Walk

Back to our September trip. So Judy and I took a train from the Loire to Paris, and then another from Paris to London, passing under the English Channel. For people in that part of the world this is not a big deal but it made us feel so very sophisticated.

Kensington Garden flower walk with Albert Memorial in the background.
Kensington Garden flower walk with Albert Memorial in the background.

One of the first things we did in London was visit Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens. We saw only a fraction of these enormous public spaces. Also, I have only a vague idea of what most of the plants were. But frankly I’m tired tonight, so this post will be more pics and less narrative.

Hyde Park has a big lagoon called the serpentine. Lots of birds to feed.
Hyde Park has a big lagoon called the serpentine. Lots of birds to feed.

 

Hyde Park London
Speaking of birds to feed, this guy has his own personal tribe of pigeons. Lots of Hyde Park is just open turf.

We started out by walking through Hyde Park.

Albert Memorial
Albert Memorial

 

Shine on, Albert.
Shine on, Albert.

We discovered the Albert Memorial after passing into Kensington Garden. Judging from this monument, there was nothing reserved about Queen Victoria’s feelings for her late husband. The memorial is a bit over the top with heaps of statuary. At the four corners of the monument are figures representing the devastation felt at Albert’s death in all four corners of the globe. That’s what it seemed like anyway. I think the statuary above represents the Near East.

Albert Memorial Hall

And the Albert Memorial Hall was also close at hand.

Kensington Garden Flower Walk

Once we were done paying our respects to Albert, we enjoyed the Kensington Garden Flower Walk.

A living arbor.
A living arbor.

 

Kensington Garden Flower Walk

 

Some kind of Fuschia.
Some kind of Fuschia, I think.

 

Lobelia
Lobelia

 

No idea what this is. Some kind of Impatiens, maybe?
No idea what this is. Some kind of Impatiens, maybe?

 

Tithonia and Hardy Geranium.
Tithonia and Hardy Geranium.

 

Some kind of thistle? Help me out here.
Some kind of thistle? Help me out here.

 

Palm trees in London? Don't tell me they take these inside for the winter.
Palm trees in London? Don’t tell me they take these inside for the winter.

More soon on our time in London.

 

 

32 Comments on “London’s Kensington Garden Flower Walk

  1. That red and white flower is a ‘Hot Lips’ Salvia. They do really well here in the PNW. And I think the plant that looks like a thistle is a cardoon. What a fun trip you guys had last summer, you just went gallivanting all over the place.

  2. Interesting blog. Alison is right: Salvia ‘Hot Lips’.The plant you thought might be Fuchsia is a Cuphea and the thistle is a cardoon:Cynara cardunculus. It sounds as if you had a good trip.
    Chloris

  3. You guys really do get around! Alison is right on the ID’s, I believe…and yes, England is similar in climate to the PNW…certain Palms are hardy here (although they typically look pretty ratty…as your picture shows).

    • Well, it was a two week trip, a week each in France and the UK. Wish we could do it every year. I got a bunch more posts on the UK I’ll do over the winter.

  4. Jason, I love your photos they remind me the time when I’ve been to Hide park and fed the swans as well! Kensington Garden is nice, many flowers and for me it’s surprisingly the fuchsias that are blooming in September.
    I see you had interesting tour!

    • The climate in London is so much milder than Chicago, and, I imagine, St. Petersburg. So you see many plants blooming late in the season.

  5. Plants and flowers make me very excited!! Lovely photos and after looking at all this snow it really did make me realize how much I love plants!!! Glad you two made the most of your amazing trip!

  6. Wow, London too, your summer trip sounds wonderful – Apparently Prince Albert was a keen gardener and is believed to have given the Italian gardens (located inside Kensington gardens) to Queen Victoria as a gift. He then sadly died a year later aged only 42. Looking forward to see where else you visited.

      • Just 21 years, they had 9 children and by all accounts were very much in love.
        Have a great holiday and best wishes for a fabulous gardening 2014.

  7. I really love this type of planting – colourful and friendly without being “clever” and showy… the English do know how to plant up public parks nicely. šŸ˜€

  8. I read a blog by a girl in the south of England who does have a palm tree in her yard year round. I was surprised too. That’s an amazing place. I love the arbor. It looks like it might be a beech.

  9. With all the snow on the ground, it was fun to see green grass and flowers. I really was surprised seeing a palm tree growing in London.

  10. Oh, bummer. We didn’t make it to Kensington Gardens, which is funny because our hotel and our daughter’s flat was very close to it. It looks lovely. Oh well, I’ll just have to take another trip to London. šŸ˜‰

  11. I really enjoyed this post. I was there in 2009, but it was early May and there wasn’t a lot going on. I remember seeing the gardeners there with big skids of annuals, ready to be planted, and going and looking at the tags to see what they all were!

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