On the third day of the Denver Garden Bloggers Fling we visited the home garden of Rob Proctor and David Macke. Rob Proctor used to be the director of horticulture at the Denver Botanic Gardens, so I was looking forward to this visit with keen anticipation.

I need to figure out how to make sure the ground is fully covered in the Driveway Border. This is a border with a lot of tall prairie plants, and while they abundantly fill the upper stories, as it were, of the border, there is still some open ground, especially at certain times of year.

In general, I just don’t get rock gardens. They leave me baffled. Perhaps this is because I come from a region of deep soil but few rocks. (Or maybe it’s just jealousy – sour rocks?)

October is generally the last month for blooms. This year I think the unusually warm September prematurely wore out some of our fall flowers. Even so, let’s amble around the garden and see what we’ve got.

The ‘Honorine Jobert’ Japanese Anemone (Anemone x hybridus) is doing in the shady Back Garden. I’m a sucker for those gleaming ivory flowers with golden centers.

Doubling Down on Tall Plants

In addition to the bulbs, I’ve ordered some new perennials for fall planting. Most of these are for the Front Island Bed. This bed is an irregular oval wedged between the rectangular Driveway and Sidewalk Borders, all three divided by grassy paths.

At a certain point in August, the garden is swept up in a wave of yellow flowers. This is largely due to what I like to call the Susans, members of the genus Rudbeckia.

The Left Bank is what I call the part of our garden that sits west of the driveway. It consists of 4 parts: 1) The Lamppost Bed in the parkway; 2) the Crabapple Bed under the dripline (more or less) of the the ‘Donald Wyman’ Crabapple; 3) the area between the Crabapple Bed and the …

August is normally summer’s turning point. It is usually an August day when you realize that there are more flowers fading than coming into bloom. Though this year has been a little different, with the blooms of a number of plants delayed for weeks. Let’s take a look at the state of the Front Garden …

It’s a very peculiar thing. I used to have one clump of Wild Bergamot (Monarda fistulosa) in the Driveway Border, and now I have two.