All this time at home, and it’s been too cold and wet to do much in the garden lately. In fact, it snowed all afternoon today, damn it! So I have not much to do but think up schemes, schemes that will further explode my garden budget deficit.  

So before I write about spring cleanup in the garden, which is going pretty well, I have to touch on an unpleasant subject. Namely, my failure to protect all my woody plants from girdling.

About 2 weeks ago on a mild February Saturday, I decided it was time to prune our ‘Donald Wyman’ crabapple out front. Some people say crabapples should be pruned right after they bloom in order to minimize the impact on flowering the following year. Even so, I went with February so I could see what …

So you’re walking along in a pleasant Denver neighborhood of single family homes, when suddenly you come upon a front yard that looks distinctly different. This is the garden of Jim Borland, a retired radio talk show host, and one of my favorite stops on the Denver Garden Bloggers Fling last June.

Burning Bush (Euonymus alatus) is an invasive shrub that can be found in many gardens, including our own. I have not yet been able to convince Judy to let me get rid of it.

There’s an American Witch-Hazel (Hamamelis virginiana) planted on the east side of the house. Rabbits chewed it to the ground every year before I protected it with hardware cloth.  Then it bounded upward and quickly reached its current height of about 10′. It’s still growing, I think.

There are so many fruits on our  ‘Donald Wyman’ Crabapple that the branches are bending under the weight.

Winter Kill

This might seem a little late for a post on plants lost to our last winter (an extraordinarily severe one). But sometimes you need more time to be really sure of your losses.

Garden Keeping Calm for the Moment

This is not one of those times when the garden is a riot of color. It is bursting with lushness and growth, true, but tranquil greens predominate. There are some blooms, but mainly in cool whites and lavenders.

2 Useful Native Plants for Dry Shade

Starry Solomon’s Plume (Maianthemum stellatum) and Wild Currant (Ribes americanum) are both useful plants for the native shade garden, or any shade garden for that matter. They are blooming now in our own place. They are not spectacular, but they are beautiful in their own quiet way. Adaptable to a variety of light and soil …