So here’s a small bit of encouraging news for pollinators.

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Linda Boley’s garden in Boulder, Colorado, is a treat for birds, people, and pollinators.

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The garden of Jean Morgan in Louisville, Colorado, is bursting with personality.

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Do you know about Botanical Interests? If not, you should – especially if you like to start flowers and vegetables from seed. This seed company has over 600 items to choose from, with a strong emphasis on heirloom and organic varieties.

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In general, I just don’t get rock gardens. They leave me baffled. Perhaps this is because I come from a region of deep soil but few rocks. (Or maybe it’s just jealousy – sour rocks?)

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Flingers descending on the Shinn’s garden

First stop on the first full day of the 2019 Fling was in Loveland, about 50 miles north of Denver on the I-25 corridor along the eastern edge of the Rocky Mountains. Here we visited the High Plains Environmental Center, which works to integrate conservation principles into regional development.

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Very much hope that you had a happy Turkey Day. We had a smallish group, though certainly big enough: Judy and I, our sons Daniel and David, and their partners Beckee and Meredith.

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At any given time starting about noon, most of us were squeezed into the kitchen working on the many dishes needed for our feast, though my role was limited mostly to washing dishes and quick trips for last minute groceries.

We see hawks in the back garden, but usually they are perched on a distant branch, or sometimes they come swiftly gliding through, hoping to snatch some unfortunate smaller bird.

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The time has come to start writing about the 2019 Garden Bloggers Fling in earnest. One thing I have wondered about: why is it Bloggers? Shouldn’t it be Bloggers’, with an apostrophe? It’s a mystery. In any case, these Fling posts may make you feel disoriented as to time because the photos are from June and it’s chilly November outside.

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Burning Bush (Euonymus alatus) is an invasive shrub that can be found in many gardens, including our own. I have not yet been able to convince Judy to let me get rid of it.

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Burning Bush by our garage, transitioning to fall color.
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