Tag: Native Plants

New Grant Program for Pollinator Habitat

So here’s a small bit of encouraging news for pollinators.

High Plains Environmental Center

First stop on the first full day of the 2019 Fling was in Loveland, about 50 miles north of Denver on the I-25 corridor along the eastern edge of the Rocky Mountains. Here we visited the High Plains Environmental Center, which works to integrate conservation principles into regional development.

Euonymus Anonymous

Burning Bush (Euonymus alatus) is an invasive shrub that can be found in many gardens, including our own. I have not yet been able to convince Judy to let me get rid of it.

American Pokeweed: Bane or Beauty?

There’s an American Pokeweed (Phytolacca americana) growing across the alley from our house. It emerged from an overgrown hedge this year that our new neighbors have cut to the ground.

Starry, Starry Day

Aster means “star”, and so the days of autumn hereabouts are full of stars.

Another Useful Goldenrod

Currently we don’t have any of the tall goldenrods in the garden, except for a few volunteer wildlings scattered in corners here and there. We do have a lot of Bluestem Goldenrod (Solidago caesia), however.

That’s Where the Tall Plants Grow

I have a lot of admiration for writer and landscape designer Benjamin Vogt. His blog, newsletter, and other writings make very useful reading for anyone interested in the intersection between gardening and ecology.

Venerable Vervain

Hoary Vervain (Verbena stricta) is an attractive but not a showy plant. But it has great value from a wildlife perspective. First, let’s deal with the name. “Hoary” does not mean what some of you think it means (don’t bother to deny it). It actually means appearing aged, as in white-haired or grizzled. And in …

The Front Garden in Mid-July

If I were to sum up the current state of the front garden in 2 words, they would be: Bee Balm. Bee Balm, Bee Balm, Bee Balm. Specifically, Monarda didyma ‘Raspberry Wine’. The Bee Balm is so visually dominant in part because so many other attention-grabbing plants are blooming late.

If the Goatsbeard Fits, Plant It

A single Goatsbeard (Aruncus dioicus) goes a long way. It’s a big plant – ours grows about 5 feet tall with a 4 foot spread. It’s a perennial but looks more like a small shrub. But if you have the space in a spot that’s moist and shady, this plant has a lot to offer. …