Tag: Ostrich Ferns

Some Garden Highlights of 2018, January to May

As I recall, winter was in no hurry to depart this year, and spring was tardy in arriving.

Again With The Ferns And Bleeding Hearts

Yes, yes – I know I posted about Ostrich Ferns (Matteuccia struthiopteris) and Bleeding Hearts (Lamprocapnos spectabilis) less than a week ago. But such a change in those few days!

Fiddleheads, Ferns, Bluebells, and Bleeding Hearts

A classic spring combination consists of ferns, bleeding hearts (Lamprocapnos spectabilis) and Virginia Bluebells (Mertensia virginica).

Foliage Appreciation Day for May

Many of us set aside the 22nd of each month for taking note of the foliage in our gardens. Garden Bloggers’ Foliage Day is hosted by Christina of My Hesperides Garden. However, I prefer to call it Foliage Appreciation Day (FAD), as it… Read More

Foliage and Fruits of June

Recently a friend told me I needed more color and variegation among the foliage in my garden. I admit that when I think about  plants, the foliage is often an afterthought. That’s one reason I like to participate in Garden Bloggers Foliage… Read More

No Man is Poor Who Has Fronds

Even gardeners like myself who gravitate to bright colors realize that from time to time you have to pause to appreciate the more subtle beauties of foliage. May is a good time to do that, because the fronds and leaves are so… Read More

You Lookin’ At Me?

All avid gardeners feel compelled to inspect their gardens after any sort of lengthy separation. In fact, the separation may have been only between 8 am and 6 pm of the very same day. So you can imagine how I felt after… Read More

End of Month View: May 2013

It’s been a very long day so I am just going to post some photos of various parts of the garden at the end of May. These pictures were actually taken on Sunday, but close enough. First, the driveway raised bed. The foundation… Read More

Foliage Follow-Up: May 2013

May is a time for fresh green foliage, before heat and drought and little critters give us leaves looking tired and tattered. To begin with, there is wild ginger (Asarum canadense). Not really ginger, but the root does have a strong ginger… Read More